95 or 98 Ron

Butthead

Member
What do you guys use, I use 95, don't know if there would be any advantage going to 98 except a bigger hole in my wallet
 

Dicko

Active Member
My bike was tuned on 98, so I run 98, I run it in all my vehicles (they are all premium fuel only vehicles - Scooby doo). I have noticed i do get better mileage from 98 over 91 and 95 if (IF) I don't drive like a hoon. Like for like driving/riding 98 goes further.
 

Butthead

Member
I'll give it a bash, I do keep fuel consumption records and my rides are usually the same location so thats a constant for a comparison, lucky my other vehicle is diesel of which the fuel cost is reasonable at the moment


Over the last 3500km I've avg 6.17 litrel/100km
 
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Dustin

Moderator
I always run my bikes on the minimum recommended octane. For most bikes, that's 87 octane here (91 RON). I have found that both subjectively and objectively my bikes favour running on 87 or 89 (91 or 92 RON) rather than 91 (95 RON) and especially 94 (98 RON). My VFR is particularly unhappy with high octane and has sluggish throttle response and noticeably difficult cold starting especially in cold weather.

$0.02
 
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Klurejr

Active Member
I always run my bikes on the minimum recommended octane. For most bikes, that's 87 octane here (91 RON).
I was wondering what RON was....

I use 87 Octane (91 RON) in both my FZ and my Vstar, both run great as long as I use Chevron Gasoline, they have the best additives and keep the bike running smooth, other places gas tend to start gunking up and ruining the starts and causing rough running.
 

Dustin

Moderator
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octane_rating

Research Octane Number (RON)[edit]
The most common type of octane rating worldwide is the Research Octane Number (RON). RON is determined by running the fuel in a test engine with a variable compression ratio under controlled conditions, and comparing the results with those for mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane.
Here in North America, we use:
Anti-Knock Index (AKI) or (R+M)/2[edit]
In most countries, including Australia, New Zealand and all of those in Europe,[citation needed] the "headline" octane rating shown on the pump is the RON, but in Canada, the United States, Brazil, and some other countries, the headline number is the average of the RON and the MON, called the Anti-Knock Index (AKI), and often written on pumps as (R+M)/2. It may also sometimes be called the Posted Octane Number (PON).
 
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